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African Society for Toxicological Sciences
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Africans boycott meetings at UN climate talks
2009-11-03 14:12:59
By ARTHUR MAX Associated Press Writer © 2009 The Associated Press— African countries ended a boycott of meetings at U.N. climate negotiations on Tuesday, after winning promises for more in-depth talks on how much rich nations need to cut greenhouse gas emissions.
BARCELONA, Spain — African countries ended a boycott of meetings at U.N. climate negotiations on Tuesday, after winning promises for more in-depth talks on how much rich nations need to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Due to the Africans' demands, most of the rest of this week's talks in Barcelona will be devoted to discussing carbon-cutting pledges rather than other issues including carbon offsets and action by developing countries, said John Ash, chairman of the negotiations on emissions. The Africans, supported by about 70 other developing countries, said industrial nations were making weak commitments to stave off dramatic temperature rises while Africa was being devastated by droughts and floods blamed on global warming. Scientists say industrial countries should reduce emissions by 25 to 40 percent from 1990 levels by 2020, but targets announced so far amount to far less. The walkout by some 50 African countries from committee work at the U.N. talks in Barcelona forced only some technical meetings to be canceled, but sent a clear signal that the developing countries would be tough negotiators at next month's final U.N. climate conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. Negotiators hope to adopt a treaty in Copenhagen on regulating carbon emissions.
 
Harmonisation of toxicology issues between developed and developing countries
2009-10-22 16:21:24
A meeting, "Harmonization of toxicology issues between developed and developing countries" was held in Sun City, South Africa in September 2009. The meeting was supported by EUROTOX and was held as part of the 7th Congress of Toxicology for Developing Countries (7CTDC). Presenters included Orish Ebere Orisakwe on Health and Environment, Mumtaz Iscan on Problems Facing Toxicologists, Jyrki Liesivuori on Shortages and Risk Assessment, John Fowler on European educational guidelines, followed by a round table with speakers Mary Gulumian and Sanmi Areola. The detailed agenda follows:
13h30-13h45 Orish Ebere Orisakwe (ERT Nigeria): Health and Environment Problems Facing Africa 13h45-14h00 Mumtaz Iscan (ERT Turkey): Problems Facing Toxicologists in Europe, Asia and Pacific Rim 14h00-14h15 Jyrki Liesivuori (ERT Finland) Shortages in people and expertise, opportunities for Risk Assessment training and experience in developing countries 14h15-14h30 John Fowler (ERT UK): European guidelines for educational expectations, necessary experience and curriculum vitae: registration of toxicologists in the European Register (ERT) At 15h00 a Round Table Discussion was held. The four speakers together with Mary Gulumian (President TOXSA) and Sanmi Areola (President of African Society for Toxicological Sciences) discussed regional support for toxicological scientists working in developing economies. The EUROTOX ERT Templates will be offered to the ASTS website. Orish addressed the immense environmental issues that face much of the sub-Saharan continent, with particular reference to e-waste (dumping of electronic waste), fossil fuel pollution, lack of safe water supplies, spoilage and desecration of the environment due to mining activities (http://www.africansocietyfortoxicologicalsciences.org/DigitalLibrary/7CTDCOrish.pdf) Mumtaz reported results from a recent IUTOX survey, with particular reference to capacity-building in education and recognition of scientists by registration and certification boards. The survey disclosed great disparity between perceptions of the contribution of toxicologists in different parts of the world, an overall need for much more basic and advanced training opportunities and a general need for increased awareness of toxicological issues (http://www.africansocietyfortoxicologicalsciences.org/DigitalLibrary/7CTDCMumtaz.pdf) Jyrki highlighted the relative decline in teaching of the basic scientific disciplines, essential to training of toxicologists and the paradox of increasing need for toxicologists, driven by ever-increasing regulation. EUROTOX continues to work at the basic training needs and recently has put major effort into the formation of advanced training opportunities under the RAAP guidelines for training of Risk Assessors (http://www.africansocietyfortoxicologicalsciences.org/DigitalLibrary/7CTDCJyrki.pdf) John focused on the great shortage of regional support for toxicologists in the sub-Saharan countries, the need for improvement of infrastructure and rationalisation of traditional approaches to medicine. He called for harmonisation of the concept 'toxicologist' based on the experience with the EUROTOX Model accumulated over 15 years, which has led to a list of over 1370 Registered Toxicologists (ERTs) at this time, and includes scientists from many parts of the world (http://www.africansocietyfortoxicologicalsciences.org/DigitalLibrary/7CTDCFowler.pdf) The workshop concluded with intensive discussions between the speakers and senior toxicologists from many parts of Africa, Professor Mary Gulumian (7CTDC convener: TOXSA) and Professor Sanmi Areola, President of the African Society of Toxicological Sciences (ASTS). Already several individual scientists based in Africa have expressed interest in becoming ERT, and plans are in hand to publish details of 'the EUROTOX Model' on the ASTS website (www.africansocietyfortoxicologicalsciences.org).
 
Travel Award to 7th Congress of Toxicology in Developing Countries
2009-07-31 09:13:52
The African Society for Toxicological Sciences (ASTS) will be offering five (5) Travel Awards of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) per person, to qualified African scientists, students, and government employees to attend an Environmental Risk Assessment Training Workshop organized by ASTS as part of the 7th Congress of Toxicology in Developing Countries (7CTDC) conference in Sun City, South Africa. The workshop will be held on Sunday, September 6, 2009. For more information and application documents, visit:2009-07-28 Newsletter ASTS 7CTDC.pdf
 
Update on Moxidectin Clinical Trials in Africa
2009-04-12 21:02:58
As you may remember, back in 2006, Dr Fisher, Wyeth Vice President, gave a keynote address on the safety profile of moxidectin which was then undergoing phase II clinical trials in Ghana for river blindness. Wyeth has now received a positive opinion from the EMEA and approval from Liberia, Ghana and DRC, to commence phase III trials. This article from the Tropical Disease Research centre highlights this program and some of the challenges involved in buidling sustainable infrastructures in Africa. Read the full article here
 
Register now for ASTS Satellite Conference 2009
2009-03-03 14:56:36
Satellite conference will bring experts and stakeholders together to discuss toxicological challenges and begin the development of policy framework for integrating the practice of toxicology in African countries. An especial focus will be placed on expanding on earlier ASTS-sponsored sessions of defining/prioritizing toxicological challenges in Africa, expanding on the concepts of feasible risk management options, and building resource capacity for governmental entities, scientists and students in Africa.
When: Thursday Afternoon, March 19; 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM Friday Morning, March 20; 8:00 AM – 12:00 NOON
 
Lead for car batteries poisons an African town
2009-01-13 12:57:22
Battery recycling leaves deadly levels of contamination, claims 18 children Associated Press: updated 3:47 a.m. ET, Sun., Jan. 4, 2009
THIAROYE SUR MER, Senegal - First, it took the animals. Goats fell silent and refused to stand up. Chickens died in handfuls, then en masse. Street dogs disappeared. Then it took the children. Toddlers stopped talking and their legs gave out. Women birthed stillborns. Infants withered and died. Some said the houses were cursed. Others said the families were cursed.
The mysterious illness killed 18 children in this town on the fringes of Dakar, Senegal's capital, before anyone in the outside world noticed. When they did — when the TV news aired parents' angry pleas for an investigation, when the doctors ordered more tests, when the West sent health experts — they did not find malaria, or polio or AIDS, or any of the diseases that kill the poor of Africa.
They found lead.
The dirt here is laced with lead left over from years of extracting it from old car batteries. So when the price of lead quadrupled over five years, residents started digging up the earth to get at it. The World Health Organization says the area is still severely contaminated, 10 months after a government cleanup. The tragedy of Thiaroye Sur Mer gives a glimpse at how the globalization of a modern tool — the car battery — can wreak havoc in the developing world. As the demand for cars has increased, especially in China and India, so has the demand for lead-acid car batteries. About 70 percent of the lead manufactured worldwide goes into car batteries, which are also used to power TVs and cell phones in some areas. Waves of lead poisoning Both the manufacturing and the recycling of these batteries has moved mostly to the Third World. Between 2005 and 2006, four waves of lead poisoning involving batteries were reported in China. And in the Vietnamese village of Dong Mai, lead smelting left 500 people with chronic illnesses and 25 children with brain damage before the government shut it down three years ago, according to San Francisco-based OK International, which works on environmental standards for battery manufacturing. Thiaroye Sur Mer is a town of 100,000 where yearly rains leave people wading through knee-deep water inside their cement-block houses. A train track bisects the town and daily trains speed through just a few steps from homes. The ocean used to supply a livelihood, but fishing hasn't been good the past few years. Young men have increasingly taken to trying to sneak into Europe aboard large canoes with outboard motors. For years, the town's blacksmiths extracted lead from car batteries and remolded it into weights for fishing nets. It's a dangerous, messy process in which workers crack open the batteries with a hatchet and pull small pieces of lead out of skin-burning acid. The work left the dirt of Thiaroye dense with small lead particles. Read the rest of the story here: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28484477//deck/
 
REPORT ON THE 3RD ZETA-12 SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE
2009-01-09 14:57:52
The 3rd ZETA-12 Scientific Conference came on the heels of a series of successful outings by the ZETA-12 Group in her efforts to impact the scientific, academic, research communities, government stakeholders and policy makers at various levels of the Nigerian. ZETA-12 started as a subgroup of the medical students Research Group (MESREG) of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Nnewi Campus, Nigeria in 2004, under the mentorship of the Orish Ebere Orisakwe. So far two annual scientific conferences/meetings have been held with profound success, in addition to other major research activities/outings. This third meeting was organised in collaboration with the Nigerian Chapter of Society of Quality Assurance (NRCSQA), a group that recently came into existence in July 2008 and the Association for Good Clinical Practice in Nigeria (AGCPN) which has collaborated with ZETA-12 since 2007. The conference provided a great opportunity to build upon the precepts earlier established during previous research activities and to introduce the “gospel of quality research” to a relatively new environment and set of individuals, naïve to the existence and vision of both ZETA-12 and SQA; hence the choice of University of Nigeria Enugu Campus as the venue for the main conference.
REPORT ON THE 3RD ZETA-12 SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE HELD IN COLLABORATION WITH SQA (www.sqa.org) AND AGCPN (www.agcpn.org) ON WEDNESDAY 12TH TO FRIDAY 14TH, NOVEMBER, 2008 AT • Ikem Isi-Uzo Local Government Area, Enugu State, Nigeria. •

The Faculty of Business Administration Lecture Auditorium, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Nigeria. Theme: Quality Issues in Biomedical Research and Drug Development: The role of GxPs (GCP, GLP, GCLP, and GMP) in Quality Health Care Packaging and Delivery. BACKGROUND/INTRODUCTION: The 3rd ZETA-12 Scientific Conference came on the heels of a series of successful outings by the ZETA-12 Group in her efforts to impact the scientific, academic, research communities, government stakeholders and policy makers at various levels of the Nigerian. ZETA-12 started as a subgroup of the medical students Research Group (MESREG) of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Nnewi Campus, Nigeria in 2004, under the mentorship of the Orish Ebere Orisakwe. So far two annual scientific conferences/meetings have been held with profound success, in addition to other major research activities/outings. This third meeting was organised in collaboration with the Nigerian Chapter of Society of Quality Assurance (NRCSQA), a group that recently came into existence in July 2008 and the Association for Good Clinical Practice in Nigeria (AGCPN) which has collaborated with ZETA-12 since 2007. The conference provided a great opportunity to build upon the precepts earlier established during previous research activities and to introduce the “gospel of quality research” to a relatively new environment and set of individuals, naïve to the existence and vision of both ZETA-12 and SQA; hence the choice of University of Nigeria Enugu Campus as the venue for the main conference.

PRE-CONFERENCE MEETINGS/PLANNING: Considering the geographical locations of the active members of the group and their individual responsibilities, the planning for the meeting was initiated and mostly executed through email communications. The recently concluded September AGCPN Train-the-trainer program in which several ZETA-12 and SQA members attended also gave us the opportunity to meet at Enugu, the coal city to articulate the ZETA-12 event. The NRCSQA - the recently inaugurated regional chapter of SQA (www.sqa.org) along with the Association for Good Clinical Practice in Nigeria- (AGCPN www.agcpn.org) who in the past year has become a formidable partner with the ZETA-12 Research Group thus became our conference partners/collaborators for this 3rd meeting. PUBLICITY: Calls for Session proposals and abstracts were made ahead of the time through emails to all on the mailing list of ZETA-12, AGCPN and NRCSQA. These include researchers and students from every part of Nigeria and beyond. The call for abstracts had a good impact on the publicity efforts as abstracts were received from Nigeria, the Republic of Cameroon, and the United States of America.

Locally, letters and posters were used to invite people from the South-East Zone of Nigeria. The result was evident as participants attended from several states of the federation including Abia, Anambra, Ebonyi, Enugu and Imo States. Various disciplines, the academia and administrative sectors were also represented in the main conference. Truly, it was a hetero-disciplinary event. The posters designed after the manner of the previous year, contained the details of the Pre-Conference Seminar at Ikem, Isi-Uzo L.G.A of Enugu State as well as the conference proper at the Faculty of Business Administration lecture Auditorium, of the University of Nigeria Enugu Campus (UNEC).

The theme of the Pre-Conference Seminar was “The role of Community-Based Research Projects (CBRP) in nation building”. This Pre-conference theme actually delighted many people within and beyond Nigeria. FUNDING: The conference was fully funded by dedicated members of ZETA-12 who started by contributing Five Thousand Naira (N5, 000. 00). Other funds raised accrued from the conference registration of non-members. The conference registration was optional as we resolved to give all and sundry the privilege to participate with or without registration. New students, joining ZETA-12 also registered with the sum of One Thousand Naira Only (N1, 000.00). In the course of the conference, our guest and advisor Dr Emmanuel O. Nna a clinical scientist from Imperial College, London also made huge financial contributions to the event. We remain very indebted to his benevolence. OTHER LOGISTICS The venue of the Pre-conference seminar was provided by the Isi-Uzo Local Government Council which also hosted the event. The main two-day conference held at the Faculty of Business Administration Lecture Auditorium of the University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, courtesy of the Dean Faculty of Business Administration, Prof (Mrs) Modum U. These venues were given free.

DAY 1-Pre-Conference Seminar: Wednesday, 12th November, 2008. THEME: “The Role of Community-Based Research Projects (CBRP) in Nation Building”. LOCATION: Ikem, Isi-Uzo L. G. A., Enugu State, Nigeria. An eleven-member ZETA-12 team took off from the University of Nigeria Enugu Campus by midmorning of Wednesday to Ikem, a town in Isi-Uzo Local Government Area. Isi-Uzo is within Enugu East Senatorial Zone, and accessible through the Protea-Nike lake Resort road in Enugu. The team constituted of practicing medical doctors, medical laboratory scientists, a geographer, a physiotherapist and our London-based international faculty-Dr Emmanuel O. Nna who is a Clinical Scientist with Imperial College London. A journey about two hours plagued by the poor road network turned out to be a fulfilling one. We were saved the great discomfort of the dusty terrain because of the air-condition bus we rode on. The journey would not have taken so long but for the bad terrain; the entire roads in Isi-Uzo Local Government Area are to this day un-tarred. It is encouraging to note however that bulldozers and graders were seen working on the roads, courtesy of the Isi-Uzo Local government Council. At the Isi-Uzo Local Government border, we stopped to see some local streams which were tributaries to the River Ebenyi which is the main subject of the Ikem Water Project (IWP) study. On arrival we were received by the senior staff of the Isi-Uzo Local Government Area who were excited at the prospects of the study ZETA-12 was about to embark upon. We had the opportunity to visit the banks of the river where the villagers fetch water. These represent our proposed project sites where some of the community representatives were on hand to intimate us on the water usage patterns of Ikem people.

Basic enquiries were made as to the source of drinking water for the communities, maintenance of year-round supply, local purification techniques e.t.c. The team also visited the District Hospital at Ikem-which was said to serve many communities within the five (5) towns in Isi-Uzo Local Government Area. It was observed to be in a state of disrepair, dilapidated and in an obvious need for immediate renovation. The facility which was said to serve about twenty thousand people or more people did not have an active emergency unit, and basic services were sustained by individual philanthropic efforts. It is however noteworthy, to have learnt that both the Isi-Uzo Local Government Council, and the Enugu State Government have initiated measures for the immediate revampment of the facility. We finally got back to the Isi-Uzo Local Government Council Hall, where we met with the waiting audience among whom were community and local government leaders. The reception was warm, and very enthusiastic. After detailed introduction of the visiting team and the hosting communities, Dr Emmanuel Nna gave the people a keynote speech on the “The role of Community-Based Research Projects (CBRP) in nation building”. Our proposed project (IWP) on studying the water bodies and water usage patterns of Ikem and Isi-Uzo people was elaborately explained to the people. They were also intimated on the possible areas that ZETA-12 could assist in promoting Good Clinical Practice and proper Health Care packaging and delivery at the Ikem District Hospital.

A detailed series of discussion ensured afterwards with both the Chairman of the Local Government, Dr Samuel Chijioke Ugwu and other members of his executive council contributing immensely. The hallmark of the occasion was the declaration of the Isi-Uzo Local Government Council of their readiness to give ZETA-12 their full support in any Community-Based Research Projects (CBRP) that may help the rural populace. Other individuals both leaders and villagers also pledged their support. We thus succeeded in perfecting our “community consenting procedure” ahead of the inception of the ZETA-12 IWP, a project that was approved by the Local Government council in 2006 and which involves experts both from USA and UK. The ZETA-12 team departed for Enugu by evening time same day after a brief refreshment in the Chairman’s lodge. (See photographs 1a-f ).

CONFERENCE PROPER DAY 2- Thursday, 13th November, 2008.

LOCATION- Faculty of Business Administration Lecture Auditorium, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.

The main conference started after an opening prayer with series of welcome speeches from the stakeholders. The President of ZETA-12 Research Group, Dr Oragwu Chikelue Ifeanyichukwu, in the course of his speech gave the history of the group, her focus and interests which he described as rapidly enlarging, to accommodate the current needs of the times and that of our people. He expounded on the expected means to achieve these goals which include networking and affiliating with other research groups, both within Nigeria and with the international community. He acknowledged all who played one role or the other to make the day a possibility. The President of the Nigerian Chapter of SQA (NRCSQA), Dr Obi Ejeatuluchukwu also gave a welcome speech and read the SQA Congratulatory message to ZETA-12, on behalf of MaryEllen Lander, RQAP-GCP (President) and Elliott Graham, RQAP-GLP (Executive Director) of SQA, USA. The session Chair was Prof Orish Ebere Orisakwe, the ZETA-12 mentor and a Consultant Toxicologist with the Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus. This first day’s sessions/lectures were designed to showcase the importance of academic research. Keynote lectures delivered include: * Challenges of Quality Assurance in citations on lymphoangiogenesis in cancer; by Prof Wilson I. B. Onuigbo, a renowned pathologist of great repute who is an international adviser of ZETA-12. * Mycotoxins in Nigerian staple foods and beverages; by Prof Ngozi Onyemelukwe; a professor of ………… with the Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, UNEC, Enugu. * Molecular Pathology: The Application of Molecular diagnostics to Pathology. * Choice of House Keeping Genes for Normalization of Real time Quantitative PCR of Tumour Markers. These two lectures were delivered by Dr Emmanuel O Nna, a clinical Scientist from Imperial College London, who is also an International adviser of ZETA-12.

The lectures were interspersed with discussions featuring questions and answer sessions. We also had a promotional presentation from Access Bank Plc, during which they made strong case for society’s patronage of their special debit/credit cards. The first day event ended at about 5.20pm. Day 3: Friday, 14th November, 2008 LOCATION- Faculty of Business Administration Lecture Auditorium, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus. The final day was the most exciting for the entire audience as it captured and integrated all the conference aspects vis-à-vis the theme “Quality Issues in Biomedical Research and Drug Development: The role of GxPs (GCP, GLP, GCLP, and GMP) in Quality Health Care Packaging and Delivery”. The Chair of the second day event was Prof Ifeoma Joy Okoye, a professor of Radiology with UNEC, and the Chairman of AGCPN/African Coordinator of CITI.

Prof Okoye set the stage by giving a detailed account of how AGCPN has faired in the last 3 years towards building individual and institutional capacity for Clinical Research and Indigenous drug development. Dr Emmanuel Nna O who succeeded in “infecting” the audience with his passion for entrepreneurial research, delivered a mind blowing lecture on “The bias of Clinical Trials and the Need for Robust Legislation in Nigeria”. The Executive Director of ZETA-12, Dr Maduabuchi John-Moses U who is also the Vice President of the NRCSQA gave and inspiring lecture on “Quality Assurance Profession in emerging economies; Career and job opportunities for multi-disciplines in Nigeria.” This series of lectures led to a lot of deliberations and resolutions on what must be done by the regulatory authorities and research communities in Nigeria and other developing nations. The resolve of ZETA-12 to promote the GxPs among the academia and research communities was also highlighted. Of particular interest to most clinical researchers was the issue of Quality Control/Assurance in medical laboratories, re-echoing the need for capacity building in GCP/GCLP. (Please see the communiqué, attached.).

Other featured events of the day were a lecture on the Determination of LD50: The “Up-And-Down” Procedure by Dr Afonne OJ and some paper presentations on …………….by Dr Ngozi Umeadi (nee Nzegwu) and on………………Ugochukwu Ezedigboh. The Executive Director of ZETA-12 also gave a speech on behalf of Caligeo Clinical-One Vision, a US-based Contract Research Organisation which sent a good will message and abstract to the conference. Dr Nna Emmanuel was also given another opportunity to speak to students and the entire audience on grant writing and funding sources for research. The conference also featured the ZETA-12 AGM/meeting of SQA members. Many of the participants expressed their interest to join the NRCSQA and AGCPN and they were told the modalities involved; an expected end of the collaborative efforts between AGCPN, SQA and ZETA-12. The meeting ended at about 4.45pm. Attendance was over 110, but 104 actually registered. (Please see photographs 2 a-t).

IMMEDIATE POST CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES

The sponsors, participants and guests who had honoured our invitation were written and sent short messages (SMS) to express our gratitude for their support. The reports, communiqué and books of abstracts are been circulated to interested contacts of ZETA-12. A post-conference meeting for new and old members of NRCSQA was also hosted by Prof Ngozi Onyemelukwe, at FHST, UNEC, Enugu with 9 new members joining the group. CONCLUSION Once again, a landmark achievement has been made by the ZETA-12 Group, primarily in sensitizing our membership and our immediate community to see research and career and job opportunities that abound in the emerging clinical trail industry in Nigeria. The onus lies on all and sundry to nurture this passion and support groups like SQA, AGCPN and ZETA-12 in realization of our common goal. ZETA-12 is looking forward to helping individual members build more capacity for biomedical research and in helping to attract sustainable developments to rural communities the community-based research projects which has just been introduced. We know that our future events will be greater. “To God be the Glory”.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: * The Dean and Staff members, Faculty of Business Administration, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus. * The Deputy Vice Chancellor, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus. * Prof Wison I.B. Onuigbo. Consultant Pathologist, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu. * Prof Ifeoma Joy Okoye, the Chairman AGCPN and African Coordinator, Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI). * Dr Emmanuel Nna O. MD, Safety Biomedicals Ltd, UK. * Prof Orish Ebere Orisakwe. * Ms Elliott Graham, RQAP-GLP, Executive Director-SQA. * Ms MaryEllen Lander, RQAP-GCP President , SQA. * Coordinators/members of Cameroonian Society of Toxicological Sciences (CSTS) * The Executives and Members of NRCSQA * ZETA-12 Research Counsellors/Mentors/Collaborators. * Caligeo Clinical-One Vision. * All Participants/Stakeholders.
 
DEVELOPMENT OF TOXICOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURES IN AFRICA: UNDERSTANDING THE PREMISE AND MAPPING THE APPROACH
2009-01-09 14:53:46
Presented by: African Society of Toxicological Sciences as a satellite meeting of the 2009 SOT meeting in Baltimore Thursday Afternoon, March 19 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM Location TBD Friday Morning, March 20 8:00 AM – 12:00 NOON Purpose of Meeting: The primary goal of the meeting is to bring experts, stakeholders, and interested parties together to discuss toxicological challenges and begin the development of policy framework for integrating the practice of toxicology in African countries. An especial focus will be placed on expanding on earlier ASTS-sponsored sessions of defining/prioritizing toxicological challenges in Africa, expanding on the concepts of feasible risk management options, and building resource capacity for governmental entities, scientists and students in Africa. Goals and Objectives: • To discuss approaches to building toxicological and public health resource capital in Africa • To discuss avenues for improved communication with Western toxicologists to address specific issues, such as, the environmental toxicological challenges in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria • To identify and prioritize toxicological challenges in Africa • To begin the development of a policy framework for addressing these issues Confirmed Speakers: Peter Spencer, Edmond Creppy, Mike Dourson, Rev John Nunes Detailed program will be provided soon. Please make your travel arrangements for SOT 2009 meeting in Baltimore to include being a part of this ground-breaking discussion. For more Information: Contact Sanmi Areola, PhD at (615) 340-2161; email, Sanmi.Areola@nashville.gov. or visit www.africansocietyfortoxicologicalsciences.org

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